• Aleppo After the Fall - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/24/magazine/aleppo-after-the-fall.html
    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2017/05/28/magazine/28syria12/28syria12-facebookJumbo.jpg

    One tragedy of Aleppo is that this rift between rich and poor was slowly mending in the years just before the 2011 uprisings. An economic renaissance was underway, fueled by thousands of small factories on the city’s outskirts. The workers were mostly from eastern Aleppo, and the owners from the west. A trade deal with Turkey, whose border is just 30 miles to the north, brought new business and tourists and optimism. I remember sitting at cafe table with two Turkish traders just outside the citadel in late 2009. Tourists thronged all around us, and the two men talked excitedly about how new joint ventures were melting the animosity between their country and Syria. “Erdogan and Assad, they are like real friends,” one of them said, referring to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey.

    This kind of optimism was one reason the revolution took so long to reach Aleppo. All through 2011, as the rest of Syria erupted in protest, its largest city was quiet. But by 2012, in the villages just beyond the city’s edges, weaponry was flowing in from across the Turkish border and battalions were being formed. “The countryside was boiling,” I was told by Adnan Hadad, an opposition activist who was there at the time and belonged to the Revolutionary Military Council in Aleppo, a group led by Syrian military officers who defected. The council was eager for more European and American recognition and sensitive to Western calls for the preservation of most of Syria’s state institutions. But local rural people tended to side with a more Islamist and less patient group called Liwa al-Tawheed. Tawheed’s members “considered themselves more authentic” and had begun getting their own funding from Persian Gulf donors, Hadad told me. In the spring of 2012, Tawheed’s members began pushing for a military takeover of Aleppo, accusing the council of excessive caution and even secret deals with the regime. The council resisted, saying they should move only when it was clear that the city’s people wanted them to. In July, Tawheed took matters into its own hands. Armed insurgents flooded eastern and southwestern parts of the city, taking over civilian houses as well as police stations in the name of the revolution. Hadad considered the move a “fatal mistake,” he told me, and resigned from the military council.

    By then, eastern Aleppo had become a rebel stronghold. In early 2013, elections for provincial councils took place, giving the rebels a civilian veneer. But the councils, initially funded by the Syrian branch of the Muslim Brotherhood, were soon under pressure from the Nusra Front, the Syrian Qaeda affiliate, and other hard-line groups. Later, ISIS forces captured parts of the city and forced residents to live by their rigid code. In theory, Aleppo was an embattled showplace for the Syrian revolution’s aspirations. In fact, most civilians were dependent on a patchwork of armed rebel factions for food and protection. The constant pressure of war left almost no room for a real economy, and many of the city’s factories had been repurposed by the rebels as military bases.

    https://seenthis.net/messages/601291 via Nidal


  • How Google Took Over the Classroom
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/13/technology/google-education-chromebooks-schools.html

    The tech giant is transforming public education with low-cost laptops and free apps. But schools may be giving Google more than they are getting. The sixth graders at Newton Bateman, a public elementary school here with a classic red brick facade, know the Google drill. In a social-science class last year, the students each grabbed a Google-powered laptop. They opened Google Classroom, an app where teachers make assignments. Then they clicked on Google Docs, a writing program, and began (...)

    #Google #Classroom #domination #données_des_étudiants

    https://seenthis.net/messages/600370 via etraces


  • Google, Not the Government, Is Building the Future
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/17/technology/personaltech/google-not-the-government-is-building-the-future.html

    One persistent criticism of Silicon Valley is that it no longer works on big, world-changing ideas. Every few months, a dumb start-up will make the news — most recently the one selling a $700 juicer — and folks outside the tech industry will begin singing I-told-you-sos. But don’t be fooled by expensive juice. The idea that Silicon Valley no longer funds big things isn’t just wrong, but also obtuse and fairly dangerous. Look at the cars, the rockets, the internet-beaming balloons and gliders, (...)

    #Google #algorithme #solutionnisme_technologique #domination

    https://seenthis.net/messages/600363 via etraces


  • Behind China’s $1 Trillion Plan to Shake Up the Economic Order - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/13/business/china-railway-one-belt-one-road-1-trillion-plan.html?emc=edit_th_20170514&n
    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2017/05/13/world/14china-road-1/14china-road-1-facebookJumbo.jpg

    #Routes_Soie

    Chinese planners are mapping out train lines from Budapest to Belgrade, Serbia, providing another artery for Chinese goods flowing into Europe through a Chinese-owned port in Greece.

    The massive infrastructure projects, along with hundreds of others across Asia, Africa and Europe, form the backbone of China’s ambitious economic and geopolitical agenda. President Xi Jinping of China is literally and figuratively forging ties, creating new markets for the country’s construction companies and exporting its model of state-led development in a quest to create deep economic connections and strong diplomatic relationships.

    The initiative, called “One Belt, One Road,” looms on a scope and scale with little precedent in modern history, promising more than $1 trillion in infrastructure and spanning more than 60 countries. To celebrate China’s new global influence, Mr. Xi is gathering dozens of state leaders, including President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia, in Beijing on Sunday.


  • The People vs. Haaretz - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/11/opinion/the-people-vs-haaretz.html?_r=0

    Un violent article contre Haaretz, qui s’inscrit dans la campagne du gouvernement israélien de museler les médias, comme il le fait avec la première chaîne de télévision

    TEL AVIV — Haaretz is an Israeli newspaper. Admired by many foreigners and few Israelis, loathed by many, mostly Israelis. Read by few, denounced by many, it is a highly ideological, high-quality paper. It has a history of excellence. It has a history of independence. It has a history of counting Israel’s mistakes and misbehavior. It has a history of getting on Israel’s nerves.

    Still, it is just a newspaper. The story of the people vs. Haaretz — that is, of a great number of Israelis’ growing dislike for the paper — is worth telling only because it tells us something about Israel itself: that the country’s far left is evolving from a political position into a mental state and that the right-wing majority has not yet evolved into being a mature, self-confident public.

    Consider an incident from mid-April. Haaretz published an op-ed by one of its columnists. It made a less-than-convincing argument that religious Zionist Israelis are more dangerous to Israel than Hezbollah terrorists. And yet, the response was overwhelming. The prime minister, defense minister, education minister and justice minister all denounced the article and the newspaper. The president condemned the article, too. The leader of the centrist party Yesh Atid called the op-ed “anti-Semitic.” Leaders of the left-of-center Labor Party called it hateful. The country was almost unified in condemnation.

    Of course, not completely unified. On the far left, a few voices supported the article and the newspaper. Some argued that the article was substantively valid. Others argued that whether the article was substantive or not, the onslaught on Haaretz is a cynical ploy to shake another pillar of the left — maybe its most visible remaining pillar.

    If there is such ploy, it doesn’t seem to be working. Last week, on the eve of Israel’s Memorial Day, a day of somber reflection, Haaretz was at it again. One article by a leading columnist explained that he could no longer fly the Israeli flag. Another seemed to be calling for a civil war. These are not exceptions; they are the rule for a newspaper that in recent years has come to rely on provocation.

    #Israël #libertés #médias

    https://seenthis.net/messages/598038 via Nouvelles d’Orient


  • Boualem Sansal : La France, état altéré - The New York Times
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/08/opinion/boualem-sansal-france-macron-le-pen.html?smid=tw-share&_r=0
    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2017/05/09/world/09sansal-inyt-FR/09sansal-inyt-1-facebookJumbo.jpg

    PARIS — Il y a du nouveau en France : un nouveau système pour désigner le président de la république. Ni plus réellement une démocratie, ni une dictature, c’est quelque chose qui n’a pas encore de nom. Un acronyme ou un mot porte-manteau construit de « démocratie », « dictature » et « ploutocratie » ferait bien l’affaire.

    Le mécanisme fonctionne ainsi : des patrons de grands groupes financiers, industriels et commerciaux, ainsi que d’éminents conseillers habitués de l’Elysée, de Matignon et de Bercy ont choisi le futur président de la république — Emmanuel Macron, en l’occurrence — et l’ont instruit de sa mission. Ensuite ces oligarques ont mobilisé l’Etat, le gouvernement, la justice, les médias, les communicants, les artistes, les cachetiers, les sondeurs, les sociétés de Paris et les grands noms de la société civile pour le porter à la magistrature suprême. La machine s’est mise au travail et en un tour de piste a fait de l’impétrant le candidat du peuple, le favori, le héros indépassable. Lui-même en est devenu convaincu.

    https://seenthis.net/messages/597304 via unagi