#cybersécurité

  • Baltimore paralysée par un virus informatique en partie créé par la NSA
    https://www.lemonde.fr/pixels/article/2019/05/29/la-ville-de-baltimore-paralysee-par-un-virus-informatique-en-partie-cree-par
    https://img.lemde.fr/2019/05/13/579/0/3500/1750/1440/720/60/0/37f7950_NYK804_USA-BALTIMORE-_0513_11.JPG

    Le problème, c’est que, trois semaines plus tard, l’affaire n’est toujours pas résolue. Les serveurs et les e-mails de la ville restent désespérément bloqués. « Service limité », indiquent les écriteaux à l’entrée les bâtiments municipaux. Les équipes municipales, le FBI, les services de renseignement américains et les firmes informatiques de la Côte ouest s’y sont tous mis : impossible de débarrasser les dix mille ordinateurs de la ville de ce virus, un rançongiciel. Et pour cause : selon le New York Times, l’un des composants de ce programme virulent a été créé par les services secrets américains, la National Security Agency (NSA), qui ont exploité une faille du logiciel Windows de Microsoft. L’ennui, c’est que la NSA s’est fait voler en 2017 cette arme informatique devenue quasi impossible à contrôler.

    Alors, beaucoup de bruit pour rien ? Non, à cause du rôle trouble de la NSA. Selon le New York Times, celle-ci a développé un outil, EternalBlue (« bleu éternel »), en cherchant pendant plus d’une année une faille dans le logiciel de Microsoft.

    L’ennui, c’est que l’outil a été volé par un groupe intitulé les Shadow Brokers (« courtiers de l’ombre »), sans que l’on sache s’il s’agit d’une puissance étrangère ou de hackeurs américains. Les Nord-Coréens l’ont utilisé en premier en 2017 lors d’une attaque baptisée Wannacry, qui a paralysé le système de santé britannique et touché les chemins de fer allemands. Puis ce fut au tour de la Russie de s’en servir pour attaquer l’Ukraine : code de l’opération NotPetya. L’offensive a atteint des entreprises, comme l’entreprise de messagerie FedEx et le laboratoire pharmaceutique Merck, qui auraient perdu respectivement 400 millions et 670 millions de dollars.

    Depuis, EternalBlue n’en finit pas d’être utilisé, par la Chine ou l’Iran, notamment. Et aux Etats-Unis, contre des organisations vulnérables, telle la ville de Baltimore, mais aussi celles de San Antonio (Texas) ou Allentown (Pennsylvanie). L’affaire est jugée, à certains égards, plus grave que la fuite géante d’informations par l’ancien informaticien Edward Snowden en 2013.

    Le débat s’ouvre à nouveau sur la responsabilité de la NSA, qui n’aurait informé Microsoft de la faille de son réseau qu’après s’être fait voler son outil. Trop tard. En dépit d’un correctif, des centaines de milliers d’ordinateurs n’ayant pas appliqué la mise à jour restent non protégés. Un de ses anciens dirigeants, l’amiral Michael Rogers, a tenté de dédouaner son ancienne agence en expliquant que, si un terroriste remplissait un pick-up Toyota d’explosifs, on n’allait pas accuser Toyota. « L’outil qu’a développé la NSA n’a pas été conçu pour faire ce qu’il a fait », a-t-il argué.

    Tom Burt, responsable chez Microsoft de la confiance des consommateurs, se dit « en total désaccord » avec ce propos lénifiant : « Ces programmes sont développés et gardés secrètement par les gouvernements dans le but précis de les utiliser comme armes ou outils d’espionnage. Ils sont, en soi, dangereux. Quand quelqu’un prend cela, il ne le transforme pas en bombe : c’est déjà une bombe », a-t-il protesté dans le New York Times.

    #Virus #NSA #Baltimore #Cybersécurité

    https://seenthis.net/messages/784198 via Articles repérés par Hervé Le Crosnier


  • The Terrifying Potential of the 5G Network | The New Yorker
    https://www.newyorker.com/news/annals-of-communications/the-terrifying-potential-of-the-5g-network
    https://media.newyorker.com/photos/5cc0bd2cd8527f31de9666c3/16:9/w_1200,h_630,c_limit/Halpern-5G.jpg

    Two words explain the difference between our current wireless networks and 5G: speed and latency. 5G—if you believe the hype—is expected to be up to a hundred times faster. (A two-hour movie could be downloaded in less than four seconds.) That speed will reduce, and possibly eliminate, the delay—the latency—between instructing a computer to perform a command and its execution. This, again, if you believe the hype, will lead to a whole new Internet of Things, where everything from toasters to dog collars to dialysis pumps to running shoes will be connected. Remote robotic surgery will be routine, the military will develop hypersonic weapons, and autonomous vehicles will cruise safely along smart highways. The claims are extravagant, and the stakes are high. One estimate projects that 5G will pump twelve trillion dollars into the global economy by 2035, and add twenty-two million new jobs in the United States alone. This 5G world, we are told, will usher in a fourth industrial revolution.

    A totally connected world will also be especially susceptible to cyberattacks. Even before the introduction of 5G networks, hackers have breached the control center of a municipal dam system, stopped an Internet-connected car as it travelled down an interstate, and sabotaged home appliances. Ransomware, malware, crypto-jacking, identity theft, and data breaches have become so common that more Americans are afraid of cybercrime than they are of becoming a victim of violent crime. Adding more devices to the online universe is destined to create more opportunities for disruption. “5G is not just for refrigerators,” Spalding said. “It’s farm implements, it’s airplanes, it’s all kinds of different things that can actually kill people or that allow someone to reach into the network and direct those things to do what they want them to do. It’s a completely different threat that we’ve never experienced before.”

    Spalding’s solution, he told me, was to build the 5G network from scratch, incorporating cyber defenses into its design.

    There are very good reasons to keep a company that appears to be beholden to a government with a documented history of industrial cyber espionage, international data theft, and domestic spying out of global digital networks. But banning Huawei hardware will not secure those networks. Even in the absence of Huawei equipment, systems still may rely on software developed in China, and software can be reprogrammed remotely by malicious actors. And every device connected to the fifth-generation Internet will likely remain susceptible to hacking. According to James Baker, the former F.B.I. general counsel who runs the national-security program at the R Street Institute, “There’s a concern that those devices that are connected to the 5G network are not going to be very secure from a cyber perspective. That presents a huge vulnerability for the system, because those devices can be turned into bots, for example, and you can have a massive botnet that can be used to attack different parts of the network.”

    This past January, Tom Wheeler, who was the F.C.C. chairman during the Obama Administration, published an Op-Ed in the New York Times titled “If 5G Is So Important, Why Isn’t It Secure?” The Trump Administration had walked away from security efforts begun during Wheeler’s tenure at the F.C.C.; most notably, in recent negotiations over international standards, the U.S. eliminated a requirement that the technical specifications of 5G include cyber defense. “For the first time in history,” Wheeler wrote, “cybersecurity was being required as a forethought in the design of a new network standard—until the Trump F.C.C. repealed it.” The agency also rejected the notion that companies building and running American digital networks were responsible for overseeing their security. This might have been expected, but the current F.C.C. does not consider cybersecurity to be a part of its domain, either. “I certainly did when we were in office,” Wheeler told me. “But the Republicans who were on the commission at that point in time, and are still there, one being the chairman, opposed those activities as being overly regulatory.”

    Opening up new spectrum is crucial to achieving the super-fast speeds promised by 5G. Most American carriers are planning to migrate their services to a higher part of the spectrum, where the bands are big and broad and allow for colossal rivers of data to flow through them. (Some carriers are also working with lower-spectrum frequencies, where the speeds will not be as fast but likely more reliable.) Until recently, these high-frequency bands, which are called millimetre waves, were not available for Internet transmission, but advances in antenna technology have made it possible, at least in theory. In practice, millimetre waves are finicky: they can only travel short distances—about a thousand feet—and are impeded by walls, foliage, human bodies, and, apparently, rain.

    Deploying millions of wireless relays so close to one another and, therefore, to our bodies has elicited its own concerns. Two years ago, a hundred and eighty scientists and doctors from thirty-six countries appealed to the European Union for a moratorium on 5G adoption until the effects of the expected increase in low-level radiation were studied. In February, Senator Richard Blumenthal, a Democrat from Connecticut, took both the F.C.C. and F.D.A. to task for pushing ahead with 5G without assessing its health risks. “We’re kind of flying blind here,” he concluded. A system built on millions of cell relays, antennas, and sensors also offers previously unthinkable surveillance potential. Telecom companies already sell location data to marketers, and law enforcement has used similar data to track protesters. 5G will catalogue exactly where someone has come from, where they are going, and what they are doing. “To give one made-up example,” Steve Bellovin, a computer-science professor at Columbia University, told the Wall Street Journal, “might a pollution sensor detect cigarette smoke or vaping, while a Bluetooth receiver picks up the identities of nearby phones? Insurance companies might be interested.” Paired with facial recognition and artificial intelligence, the data streams and location capabilities of 5G will make anonymity a historical artifact.

    To accommodate these limitations, 5G cellular relays will have to be installed inside buildings and on every city block, at least. Cell relays mounted on thirteen million utility poles, for example, will deliver 5G speeds to just over half of the American population, and cost around four hundred billion dollars to install. Rural communities will be out of luck—too many trees, too few people—despite the F.C.C.’s recently announced Rural Digital Opportunity Fund.

    Deploying millions of wireless relays so close to one another and, therefore, to our bodies has elicited its own concerns. Two years ago, a hundred and eighty scientists and doctors from thirty-six countries appealed to the European Union for a moratorium on 5G adoption until the effects of the expected increase in low-level radiation were studied. In February, Senator Richard Blumenthal, a Democrat from Connecticut, took both the F.C.C. and F.D.A. to task for pushing ahead with 5G without assessing its health risks. “We’re kind of flying blind here,” he concluded. A system built on millions of cell relays, antennas, and sensors also offers previously unthinkable surveillance potential. Telecom companies already sell location data to marketers, and law enforcement has used similar data to track protesters. 5G will catalogue exactly where someone has come from, where they are going, and what they are doing. “To give one made-up example,” Steve Bellovin, a computer-science professor at Columbia University, told the Wall Street Journal, “might a pollution sensor detect cigarette smoke or vaping, while a Bluetooth receiver picks up the identities of nearby phones? Insurance companies might be interested.” Paired with facial recognition and artificial intelligence, the data streams and location capabilities of 5G will make anonymity a historical artifact.

    #Surveillance #Santé #5G #Cybersécurité

    https://seenthis.net/messages/778499 via Articles repérés par Hervé Le Crosnier


  • Beaucoup de gens croient que, contrairement au WiFi, les techniques de la téléphonie mobile (GSM, 3G, 4G, etc) sont sûres et (j’ai entendu ça dans une réunion pourtant sérieuse) « non piratables ».

    C’est évidemment tout à fait faux, comme le rappelle l’#EFF, qui demande une prise de conscience et une action sérieuse contre ces failles de sécurité.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/26/opinion/cellphones-security-spying.html

    #cybersécurité #SS7 #IMSI_catcher

    https://seenthis.net/messages/747287 via Stéphane Bortzmeyer


  • #Cybersécurité, #Reconnaissance_faciale et #Réseaux_Sociaux :
    Social Mapper, quand la reconnaissance faciale devient trop accessible… voire un danger
    https://www.presse-citron.net/social-mapper-quand-la-reconnaissance-faciale-devient-trop-accessible

    Ce petit logiciel permet en effet de faire du tracking à travers différents réseaux sociaux. LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram…peu ou prou tous les réseaux sociaux sont au menu. Il suffit d’un nom et d’une photo. Ce petit logiciel permet de retrouver n’importe qui sur les différentes plateformes de façon automatique.

    Ce logiciel est en open-source, sous licence gratuite, il est disponible sur GitHub sans aucune limitation ou presque quant à son usage. Ce sont les chercheurs de Trustedwave SpiderLabs qui l’ont mis en ligne. L’idée est bien sûr d’aider les chercheurs en sécurité.

    Complément : Un outil de reconnaissance faciale traque les profils sur les réseaux sociaux
    https://siecledigital.fr/2018/08/09/un-outil-de-reconnaissance-faciale-traque-les-profils-sur-les-reseaux-
    https://sd-cdn.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/outil-de-reconnaissance-faciale-770x515.png

    Sur son blog officiel, #Trustwave a déclaré : « Et si cela pouvait être automatisé et réalisé à grande échelle avec des centaines ou des milliers de personnes ? »

    https://seenthis.net/messages/713954 via ¿’ ValK.


  • Inside ProtectWise, the Futuristic Startup That Ran Cybersecurity for the Super Bowl | Inc.com
    https://www.inc.com/kevin-j-ryan/protectwise-futuristic-cybersecurity-startup.html
    https://www.incimages.com/uploaded_files/inlineimage/630x0/Immersive-Grid-cityscape_42721.jpg

    “Most cybersecurity systems have the same interface as the cable modem in your house,” he says. “That needed to change.”

    ProtectWise, which Chasin co-founded in 2014 in Denver with former McAfee exec Gene Stevens, completely reimagines the way cybersecurity software looks. Instead of staring at pie charts and seemingly infinite strings of characters, you’re presented with something much more visual: a three-dimensional cityscape. Your company’s entire network is laid out in front of you, and you can easily detect and observe abnormal behavior in real time—or rewind to see when and how an attack occurred.

    To create the company’s futuristic interface, Chasin recruited Jake Sargeant, a Hollywood designer who has worked on visual effects for CGI-intensive films like Tron: Legacy and Terminator Salvation.

    #interface #visualisation #cybersécurité aussi (mais ça je m’en fous un peu)

    Une passerelle #Hollywood > #Silicon_Valley dans le sens inverse

    https://seenthis.net/messages/606595 via Fil


  • Le #virus #wannacry révèle les lacunes de la cybersécurité mondiale
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/220517/le-virus-wannacry-revele-les-lacunes-de-la-cybersecurite-mondiale

    Une dizaine de jours après l’apparition du logiciel-rançon, de nombreuses responsabilités peuvent être pointées : celle de la #NSA qui a directement inspiré le virus, celle des États qui laissent se développer un véritable marché des failles informatiques et celle des entreprises qui avaient été prévenues d’une attaque.

    #International #cybersécurité #ransomware #Shadow_Brokers


  • Des hackers modifient la composition de l’eau d’une station d’épuration
    http://api.rue89.nouvelobs.com/2016/03/29/hackers-modifient-composition-leau-dune-station-depuration-2635

    Un #piratage informatique peut avoir des conséquences jusque dans votre verre d’eau. C’est en tout cas ce que révèle le bilan des incidents de cybersécurité dressé par l’opérateur américain Verizon et repéré par Sciences et Avenir. L’affaire a été révélée lorsque la société (de traitement des eaux) a décidé de faire appel aux équipes chargées du cyber-risque de Verizon pour renforcer son système d’information afin d’anticiper tout problème éventuel. Or, une fois sur place, les experts ont constaté avec stupeur que la station d’épuration était déjà la proie...

    #eau #hacking #cybersécurité


  • Attaques informatiques contre l’Assemblée et le #Sénat
    http://api.rue89.nouvelobs.com/2016/01/27/attaques-informatiques-contre-lassemblee-senat-262976

    Après avoir entravé le site du Parti socialiste, des internautes s’en prennent aujourd’hui à ceux de l’Assemblée nationale et du Sénat. Alors que le gouvernement présentait sa version de la déchéance de nationalité, et que Jean-Jacques Urvoas était annoncé à la place de Christiane Taubira à la Justice, Assemblee-Nationale.fr et Senat.fr moulinaient dans la semoule. La faute, à en croire nos confrères de NextINpact qui se sont entretenus avec les services informatiques du Parlement, à des attaques en déni de service (Ddos). Très fréquentes sur le réseau, voire...

    #assemblée_nationale #informatique #cybersécurité


  • B0unty Factory – Je vous dis tout sur le Projet X que j’ai annoncé la semaine dernière « korben
    http://korben.info/b0unty-factory.html

    vous savez comme moi que toutes les entreprises américaines sont soumises au Patriot Act. Cela signifie que si une entreprise européenne confie son programme de Bug Bounty à une plateforme américaine, il se peut que les failles et les exploits envoyés par les chercheurs en sécurité du monde entier, intéressent de près des organisations comme la #NSA. Cela est donc un exercice périlleux pour la société située en Europe.

    Il était donc indispensable de proposer une plateforme de bug bounty qui soit Européenne et qui permette à toutes les sociétés d’améliorer leur sécurité, peu importe les pays où elles se trouvent. Pour résumer, B0unty Factory fait office d’intermédiaire technique, financier et législatif entre les pentesteurs et les sociétés qui souhaitent lancer leurs Bug Bounties. Si le sujet vous intéresse, je vous invite à lire notre FAQ.

    Ce que nous allons proposer au sein de Yes We Hack, c’est un cercle vertueux entre les compétences des experts en sécurité qui recherchent du travail / des missions et les besoins en recrutement des entreprises.

    #hacking #silicon_army à la française #cybersécurité

    http://seenthis.net/messages/453960 via Fil


  • #UIT: indicateurs de #cybersécurité rapport 2015
    http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Cybersecurity/Pages/GCI.aspx

    Legal measures
    Criminal legislation
    Regulation and compliance

    Technical measures
    Establishment of a national computer incident response team (CIRT) or equivalent
    A government-approved framework for cybersecurity standards
    A government-approved framework for certification

    Organizational measures
    A policy to promote cybersecurity
    A roadmap for governance
    A responsible agency for managing a national strategy or policy
    National benchmarking

    Capacity-building
    Standardization development
    Professional skills development
    Professional certification
    Agency certification

    Cooperation
    Intra-State cooperation
    Intra–agency cooperation
    Public private partnerships
    International cooperation

    http://seenthis.net/messages/434867 via Fil


  • Les Américains s’inquiètent de voir les Russes fureter autour des câbles sous-marins
    http://api.rue89.nouvelobs.com/2015/10/26/les-americains-sinquietent-voir-les-russes-fureter-autour-cable

    Comme un parfum de #guerre_froide. Ce dimanche, la presse américaine a relayé les inquiétudes des gradés du pays : les Russes multiplient les opérations en mer, tout près des câbles sous-marins qui connectent les #Etats-Unis au reste du monde. Et l’armée n’aime pas ça du tout. Forcément, qui dit guerre froide et soupçon d’espionnage, dit secret. Le New York Times indique ainsi : « Au Pentagone et dans les agences de renseignement du pays, les analyses portant sur l’accroissement des activités navales russes sont hautement classifiées et ne sont jamais évoquées publiquement en...

    #Internet #Russie #cyberguerre #cybersécurité


  • Un million de dollars pour hacker Apple
    http://rue89.nouvelobs.com/2015/09/22/million-dollars-hacker-apple-261318

    Le business des failles informatiques se portent bien. Et s’expose au grand jour : une boîte de sécurité informatique, Zerodium, vient de promettre 1 million de dollars à quiconque lui filerait les clés du dernier système d’exploitation d’Apple, iO9. L’idée est de trouver le moyen de pirater un iPhone ou un iPad, sans, bien sûr, en avertir les équipes de l’entreprise américaine. Wired, qui a repéré ce « wanted » des temps modernes, précise que l’art et la manière d’opérer sont laissés à l’appréciation des hackers en question : intrusion à distance, via une page web, une...

    #surveillance #NSA #cybersécurité


  • Cybersécurité : l’autorité de la concurrence américaine peut poursuivre les boîtes défaillantes
    http://rue89.nouvelobs.com/2015/08/25/etats-unis-lautorite-concurrence-pourra-poursuivre-les-boites-a-sec

    « Un chien de garde numérique capable de mordre. »

    Pour Wired, la Federal Trade Commission (FTC) peut enfin revêtir un véritable costume de gardienne des droits des internautes. Tout ça grâce à la décision d’une cour d’appel de Philadelphie, qui a jugé ce 24 août que la FTC pouvait poursuivre des entreprises à la sécurité informatique toute pourrie, et donc susceptible de porter atteinte à leurs clients. 619 000 clients visés Cette décision vient trancher un contentieux vieux de trois ans, entre l’autorité de la concurrence américaine et une chaîne d’hôtels, Wyndham. En 2012,...

    #Etats-Unis #Monde #cybersécurité #piratage


  • Climat, cyberattaques... : quel pays a peur de quoi, en data
    http://rue89.nouvelobs.com/2015/07/21/climat-cyberattaques-quel-pays-a-peur-quoi-data-260373

    Ce qui fait le plus trembler la France, c’est l’organisation de l’Etat islamique (EI ou Isis, en anglais, comme ici). En tout cas, à en croire une étude américaine du Pew Research Center, que vient d’adapter en une visualisation très efficace The Guardian. A en croire cette enquête menée en mai 2015 auprès de plus de 45 000 personnes, dans 40 pays différents, les Français interrogés seraient, dans l’ordre, « très concernés » par : l’EI (71 % des personnes interrogées) ; l’instabilité économique mondiale (49%) ; le #changement_climatique (48%) ; les cyberattaques (47%) ; le programme...

    #Monde #Etat_islamique #cybersécurité


  • La Silicon Valley renforce sa sécurité
    http://www.intelligenceonline.fr/intelligence-economique/2015/07/08/la-silicon-valley-renforce-sa-securite,108083212-GRA

    Confrontées à des menaces de plus en plus importantes de la part d’Etats et de groupes paraétatiques, les start-up les plus en vue de la Silicon Valley développent rapidement leurs départements de sûreté, en ayant recours à des vétérans des services de renseignement américains. Le site de micro-blogging Twitter vient ainsi de recruter comme responsable Global Threat Management & Business Continuity Patrick Geonetta, un ancien agent spécial du #FBI. Celui-ci devra mettre en place des plans de réaction en cas d’attaque ou d’incident majeur. Il devra également s’assurer du besoin grandissant de sécurité qu’implique le développement international du site, notamment dans les pays où celui-ci est très surveillé, comme la Russie.

    Egalement en pleine expansion - au Brésil, au Mexique, en Inde… -, le site d’information BuzzFeed a embauché ces dernières semaines Jason Reich, un ancien officier de renseignement israélien, pour superviser sa sûreté au niveau mondial.

    #cybersécurité #sécurité_informatique #silicon_army

    http://seenthis.net/messages/389826 via tbn


  • Les #Etats-Unis ont tenté de pirater le programme nucléaire nord-coréen
    http://rue89.nouvelobs.com/2015/05/31/les-etats-unis-ont-tente-pirater-programme-nucleaire-nord-coreen-25

    Selon des informations de l’agence de presse Reuters, les Etats-Unis auraient tenté de mener une cyberattaque à l’encontre de la #corée_du_nord, équivalente à celle qui a visé, en 2010, l’Iran. Mieux connu sous le nom de « Stuxnet », ce virus avait entravé le développement du programme nucléaire iranien, en détruisant des centrifugeuses de l’installation de Natanz, au Sud de Téhéran. Selon plusieurs sources des services de renseignement américain, l’agence nationale de la sécurité américaine (NSA) aurait essayé d’en faire de même contre le régime de Pyongyang ; sans succès....

    #virus_informatique #cyberguerre #cybersécurité