• Syria-Turkey briefing: The fallout of an invasion for civilians

    Humanitarians are warning that a Turkish invasion in northeast Syria could force hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes, as confusion reigns over its possible timing, scope, and consequences.

    Panos Moumtzis, the UN’s regional humanitarian coordinator for Syria, told reporters in Geneva on Monday that any military operation must guard against causing further displacement. “We are hoping for the best but preparing for the worst,” he said, noting that an estimated 1.7 million people live in the country’s northeast.

    Some residents close to the Syria-Turkey border are already leaving, one aid worker familiar with the situation on the ground told The New Humanitarian. Most are staying with relatives in nearby villages for the time-being, said the aid worker, who asked to remain anonymous in order to continue their work.

    The number of people who have left their homes so far remains relatively small, the aid worker said, but added: “If there is an incursion, people will leave.”

    The International Rescue Committee said “a military offensive could immediately displace at least 300,000 people”, but analysts TNH spoke to cautioned that the actual number would depend on Turkey’s plans, which remain a major unknown.

    As the diplomatic and security communities struggle to get a handle on what’s next, the same goes for humanitarians in northeastern Syria – and the communities they are trying to serve.

    Here’s what we know, and what we don’t:
    What just happened?

    Late on Sunday night, the White House said that following a phone call with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, “Turkey will soon be moving forward with its long-planned operation into Northern Syria,” adding that US soldiers would not be part of the move, and “will no longer be in the immediate area”.

    The Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) – the Syrian-Kurdish-led militia that until now had been supported by the United States and played a major role in wresting territory back from the so-called Islamic State (IS) group in Syria – vowed to stand its ground in the northeast.

    An SDF spokesperson tweeted that the group “will not hesitate to turn any unprovoked attack by Turkey into an all-out war on the entire border to DEFEND ourselves and our people”.

    Leading Republicans in the US Congress criticised President Donald Trump’s decision, saying it represents an abandonment of Kurdish allies in Syria, and the Pentagon appeared both caught off-guard and opposed to a Turkish incursion.

    Since then, Trump has tweeted extensively on the subject, threatening to “totally destroy and obliterate the economy of Turkey” if the country does anything he considers to be “off limits”.

    On the ground, US troops have moved out of two key observation posts on the Turkey-Syria border, in relatively small numbers: estimates range from 50 to 150 of the total who would have been shifted, out of around 1,000 US soldiers in the country.
    What is Turkey doing?

    Erdogan has long had his sights on a “safe zone” inside Syria, which he has said could eventually become home to as many as three million Syrian refugees, currently in Turkey.

    Turkish Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu said in August that only 17 percent of Turkey’s estimated 3.6 million Syrian refugees come from the northeast of the country, which is administered by the SDF and its political wing.

    Turkish and US forces began joint patrols of a small stretch of the border early last month. While Turkey began calling the area a “safe zone”, the United States referred to it as a “security mechanism”. The terms of the deal were either never made public or not hammered out.

    In addition to any desire to resettle refugees, which might only be a secondary motive, Turkey wants control of northeast Syria to rein in the power of the SDF, which it considers to be a terrorist organisation.

    One of the SDF’s main constituent parts are People’s Defense Units – known by their Kurdish acronym YPG.

    The YPG are an offshoot of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK – a Turkey-based Kurdish separatist organisation that has conducted an insurgency against the Turkish government for decades, leading to a bloody crackdown.

    While rebels fight for the northwest, and Russian-backed Syrian government forces control most of the rest of Syria, the SDF currently rules over almost all of Hassakeh province, most of Raqqa and Deir Ezzor provinces, and a small part of Aleppo province.
    How many civilians are at risk?

    There has not been a census in Syria for years, and numbers shift quickly as people flee different pockets of conflict. This makes estimating the number of civilians in northeast Syria very difficult.

    The IRC said in its statement it is “deeply concerned about the lives and livelihoods of the two million civilians in northeast Syria”; Moumtzis mentioned 1.7 million people; and Save the Children said “there are 1.65 million people in need of humanitarian assistance in this area, including more than 650,000 displaced by war”.

    Of those who have had to leave their homes in Raqqa, Deir Ezzor, and Hassakeh, only 100,000 are living in camps, according to figures from the International Committee of the Red Cross. Others rent houses or apartments, and some live in unfinished buildings or tents.

    “While many commentators are rightly focusing on the security implications of this policy reversal, the humanitarian implications will be equally enormous,” said Jeremy Konyndyk, senior policy fellow at the Center for Global Development, and a former high-ranking Obama administration aid official.

    “All across Northern Syria, hundreds of thousands of displaced and conflict-affected people who survived the horrors of the… [IS] era will now face the risk of new violence between Turkish and SDF forces.”
    Who will be first in the firing line?

    It’s unlikely all of northeast Syria would be impacted by a Turkish invasion right away, given that so far the United States has only moved its troops away from two border posts, at Tel Abyad (Kurdish name: Gire Spi), and roughly 100 kilometres to the east, at Ras al-Ayn (Kurdish name: Serê Kaniyê).

    Depending on how far into Syria one is counting, aid workers estimate there are between 52,000 to 68,000 people in this 100-kilometre strip, including the towns of Tel Abyad and Ras al-Ayn themselves. The aid worker in northeast Syria told TNH that if there is an offensive, these people are more likely, at least initially, to stay with family or friends in nearby villages than to end up in camps.

    The aid worker added that while humanitarian operations from more than 70 NGOs are ongoing across the northeast, including in places like Tel Abyad, some locals are avoiding the town itself and, in general, people are “extremely worried”.
    What will happen to al-Hol camp?

    The fate of the rest of northeast Syria’s population may also be at risk.

    Trump tweeted on Monday that the Kurds “must, with Europe and others, watch over the captured ISIS fighters and families”.

    The SDF currently administers al-Hol, a tense camp of more than 68,000 people – mostly women and children – deep in Hassakeh province, where the World Health Organisation recently said people are living “in harsh and deplorable conditions, with limited access to quality basic services, sub-optimal environment and concerns of insecurity.”

    Many of the residents of al-Hol stayed with IS through its last days in Syria, and the camp holds both these supporters and people who fled the group earlier on.

    Last week, Médecins Sans Frontières said security forces shot at women protesting in a part of the camp known as “the annex”, which holds around 10,000 who are not Syrian or Iraqi.

    The SDF also holds more than 10,000 IS detainees in other prisons, and the possible release of these people – plus those at al-Hol – may become a useful bargaining chip for the Kurdish-led group.

    On Monday, an SDF commander said guarding the prisoners had become a “second priority” in the wake of a possible Turkish offensive.

    “All their families are located in the border area,” General Mazloum Kobani Abdi told NBC News of the SDF fighters who had been guarding the prisoners. “So they are forced to defend their families.”

    https://www.thenewhumanitarian.org/news/2019/10/08/syria-turkey-briefing-fallout-invasion-civilians
    #Syrie #Turquie #guerre #conflit #civiles #invasion #al-Hol #Kurdistan #Kurdes #camps #camps_de_réfugiés
    ping @isskein

    https://seenthis.net/messages/805681 via CDB_77


  • Migrants : l’irrationnel au pouvoir ?

    Les dispositifs répressifs perpétuent le « problème migratoire » qu’ils prétendent pourtant résoudre : ils créent des migrants précaires et vulnérables contraints de renoncer à leur projet de retour au pays.
    Très loin du renouveau proclamé depuis l’élection du président Macron, la politique migratoire du gouvernement Philippe se place dans une triste #continuité avec celles qui l’ont précédée tout en franchissant de nouvelles lignes rouges qui auraient relevé de l’inimaginable il y a encore quelques années. Si, en 1996, la France s’émouvait de l’irruption de policiers dans une église pour déloger les grévistes migrant.e.s, que de pas franchis depuis : accès à l’#eau et distributions de #nourriture empêchés, tentes tailladées, familles traquées jusque dans les centres d’hébergement d’urgence en violation du principe fondamental de l’#inconditionnalité_du_secours.

    La #loi_sur_l’immigration que le gouvernement prépare marque l’emballement de ce processus répressif en proposant d’allonger les délais de #rétention administrative, de généraliser les #assignations_à_résidence, d’augmenter les #expulsions et de durcir l’application du règlement de #Dublin, de restreindre les conditions d’accès à certains titres de séjour, ou de supprimer la garantie d’un recours suspensif pour certain.e.s demandeur.e.s d’asile. Au-delà de leur apparente diversité, ces mesures reposent sur une seule et même idée de la migration comme « #problème ».

    Cela fait pourtant plusieurs décennies que les chercheurs spécialisés sur les migrations, toutes disciplines scientifiques confondues, montrent que cette vision est largement erronée. Contrairement aux idées reçues, il n’y a pas eu d’augmentation drastique des migrations durant les dernières décennies. Les flux en valeur absolue ont augmenté mais le nombre relatif de migrant.e.s par rapport à la population mondiale stagne à 3 % et est le même qu’au début du XXe siècle. Dans l’Union européenne, après le pic de 2015, qui n’a par ailleurs pas concerné la France, le nombre des arrivées à déjà chuté. Sans compter les « sorties » jamais intégrées aux analyses statistiques et pourtant loin d’être négligeables. Et si la demande d’asile a connu, en France, une augmentation récente, elle est loin d’être démesurée au regard d’autres périodes historiques. Au final, la mal nommée « #crise_migratoire » européenne est bien plus une crise institutionnelle, une crise de la solidarité et de l’hospitalité, qu’une crise des flux. Car ce qui est inédit dans la période actuelle c’est bien plus l’accentuation des dispositifs répressifs que l’augmentation de la proportion des arrivées.

    La menace que représenteraient les migrant.e.s pour le #marché_du_travail est tout autant exagérée. Une abondance de travaux montre depuis longtemps que la migration constitue un apport à la fois économique et démographique dans le contexte des sociétés européennes vieillissantes, où de nombreux emplois sont délaissés par les nationaux. Les économistes répètent qu’il n’y a pas de corrélation avérée entre #immigration et #chômage car le marché du travail n’est pas un gâteau à taille fixe et indépendante du nombre de convives. En Europe, les migrant.e.s ne coûtent pas plus qu’ils/elles ne contribuent aux finances publiques, auxquelles ils/elles participent davantage que les nationaux, du fait de la structure par âge de leur population.

    Imaginons un instant une France sans migrant.e.s. L’image est vertigineuse tant leur place est importante dans nos existences et les secteurs vitaux de nos économies : auprès de nos familles, dans les domaines de la santé, de la recherche, de l’industrie, de la construction, des services aux personnes, etc. Et parce qu’en fait, les migrant.e.s, c’est nous : un.e Français.e sur quatre a au moins un.e parent.e ou un.e grand-parent immigré.e.

    En tant que chercheur.e.s, nous sommes stupéfait.e.s de voir les responsables politiques successifs asséner des contre-vérités, puis jeter de l’huile sur le feu. Car loin de résoudre des problèmes fantasmés, les mesures, que chaque nouvelle majorité s’est empressée de prendre, n’ont cessé d’en fabriquer de plus aigus. Les situations d’irrégularité et de #précarité qui feraient des migrant.e.s des « fardeaux » sont précisément produites par nos politiques migratoires : la quasi-absence de canaux légaux de migration (pourtant préconisés par les organismes internationaux les plus consensuels) oblige les migrant.e.s à dépenser des sommes considérables pour emprunter des voies illégales. La #vulnérabilité financière mais aussi physique et psychique produite par notre choix de verrouiller les frontières est ensuite redoublée par d’autres pièces de nos réglementations : en obligeant les migrant.e.s à demeurer dans le premier pays d’entrée de l’UE, le règlement de Dublin les prive de leurs réseaux familiaux et communautaires, souvent situés dans d’autres pays européens et si précieux à leur insertion. A l’arrivée, nos lois sur l’accès au séjour et au travail les maintiennent, ou les font basculer, dans des situations de clandestinité et de dépendance. Enfin, ces lois contribuent paradoxalement à rendre les migrations irréversibles : la précarité administrative des migrant.e.s les pousse souvent à renoncer à leurs projets de retour au pays par peur qu’ils ne soient définitifs. Les enquêtes montrent que c’est l’absence de « papiers » qui empêche ces retours. Nos politiques migratoires fabriquent bien ce contre quoi elles prétendent lutter.

    Les migrant.e.s ne sont pas « la #misère_du_monde ». Comme ses prédécesseurs, le gouvernement signe aujourd’hui les conditions d’un échec programmé, autant en termes de pertes sociales, économiques et humaines, que d’inefficacité au regard de ses propres objectifs.

    Imaginons une autre politique migratoire. Une politique migratoire enfin réaliste. Elle est possible, même sans les millions utilisés pour la rétention et l’expulsion des migrant.e.s, le verrouillage hautement technologique des frontières, le financement de patrouilles de police et de CRS, les sommes versées aux régimes autoritaires de tous bords pour qu’ils retiennent, reprennent ou enferment leurs migrant.e.s. Une politique d’#accueil digne de ce nom, fondée sur l’enrichissement mutuel et le respect de la #dignité de l’autre, coûterait certainement moins cher que la politique restrictive et destructrice que le gouvernement a choisi de renforcer encore un peu plus aujourd’hui. Quelle est donc sa rationalité : ignorance ou électoralisme ?

    http://www.liberation.fr/debats/2018/01/18/migrants-l-irrationnel-au-pouvoir_1623475
    Une tribune de #Karen_Akoka #Camille_Schmoll (18.01.2018)

    #irrationalité #rationalité #asile #migrations #réfugiés #préjugés #invasion #afflux #répression #précarisation #vulnérabilité #France #économie #coût

    https://seenthis.net/messages/705790 via CDB_77





  • Un rapport accablant souligne les erreurs de #Tony_Blair sur la guerre d’Irak
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/060716/un-rapport-accablant-souligne-les-erreurs-de-tony-blair-sur-la-guerre-d-ir

    © Reuters Après sept années d’enquête, la commission Chilcot a remis un rapport très négatif sur la manière dont le gouvernement britannique a engagé le #Royaume-Uni en #Irak en #2003 aux côtés des États-Unis : renseignements défectueux, manipulation politique, impréparation militaire…

    #International #diplomatie #George_W._Bush #guerre_d'Irak #invasion #John_Chilcot #rapport_Chilcot


  • Un rapport accablant souligne les erreurs de #Tony_Blair sur la #guerre_d'Irak
    https://www.mediapart.fr/journal/international/060716/un-rapport-accablant-souligne-les-erreurs-de-tony-blair-sur-la-guerre-dira

    © Reuters Après sept années d’enquête, la commission Chilcot a remis un rapport très négatif sur la manière dont le gouvernement britannique a engagé le #Royaume-Uni en #Irak en #2003 aux côtés des États-Unis : renseignements défectueux, manipulation politique, impréparation militaire…

    #International #diplomatie #George_W._Bush #invasion #John_Chilcot #rapport_Chilcot


  • If You Think Europe Has a Refugee Crisis, You’re Not Looking Hard Enough

    From Lebanon to Turkey to Pakistan, a wave of migrants is straining governments and testing the fabrics of societies.
    Europe isn’t the front line of the world’s refugee crisis. Media reports rife with images of people trailing through Hungarian fields and crowding onto rickety Mediterranean fishing boats would have us think that it is. Yet the global reality is starkly different. As the following data show, the overwhelming majority of displaced people are living in countries that don’t really have the resources to host them — a trend that’s unlikely to abate and one that has ominous implications for the future.

    http://i.imgur.com/g47mKRD.png
    http://i.imgur.com/x46Z5mX.png
    http://i.imgur.com/TTMJWNH.png

    http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/02/02/the-weakest-links-syria-refugees-migrants-crisis-data-visualization
    #invasion #afflux #mythe #préjugé #asile #migrations #réfugiés #infographie #graphique
    cc @reka

    http://seenthis.net/messages/457266 via CDB_77


  • M of A - Into The Cauldron - Saudi And UAE Troops Invade #Yemen
    http://www.moonofalabama.org/2015/08/into-the-cauldron-saudi-and-uae-troops-invade-yemen-.html

    While many “western” media missed it, we reported that one brigade of regular United Arab Emirate troops invaded Yemen through the port of Aden. Videos from Yemen show large columns of French build Leclerc tanks and other modern UAE equipment. The Saudi and UAE spokesperson declared that they only brought equipment for Yemenis but that can not be true. The tanks will certainly be operated by people with the necessary extensive training on these expensive high tech vehicles, not with fresh off the street recruits with a few weeks of basic training.

    After taking Aden the UAE military, some Yemeni infantry forces trained over the last months outside the country and some local southern separatist groups moved north and attacked the Al Anad airbase held by the Houthi militia and parts of the Yemeni army loyal to former president Saleh. After only a few short skirmishes the Houthi retreated and the UAE troops moved into the base. They then moved further north towards Taiz.

    But the UAE military is not the only force invading Yemen.

    http://www.moonofalabama.org/images4/yemen-sitmap150807.jpg

    #invasion #E.A.U #Emirats_arabes_unis #Arabie_saoudite

    http://seenthis.net/messages/396680 via Kassem


  • The myth of invasion

    Many people believe that migration is at an all-time high and accelerating fast. Images of people crossing the Mediterranean in ramshackle boats and rising political panic about immigration all contribute to the image that migration is rising rapidly and that drastic measures are needed to stem the tide.

    These voices are not only coming from anti-immigrant parties and extremist groups. In fact, the idea that migration is rising fast has become mainstream over the past years. Every year again, organisations such as the International Organisation of Migration and the United Nations Population Division hit the news headlines with reports that migration is at an all-time high and will accelerate in the future.

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1o8PXo_G_GY/VLAGjg1g3gI/AAAAAAAAARE/5LKoQduNGkI/s1600/2015-01-09%2BMigrants%2Bas%2Bpercentage%2Bof%2Bworld%2Bpopulation.gif

    http://heindehaas.blogspot.nl/2015/05/the-myth-of-invasion.html
    #statistiques #asile #migration #chiffres #mythe #préjugé #invasion #graphique #visualisation #afflux
    cc @reka

    http://seenthis.net/messages/388550 via CDB_77